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Album Review: Kasabian Revives Rock N’ Roll With New Record – 'For Crying Out Loud'
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New Band, half•alive's Amazing Talent Could Take Them Places!!
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Album Review: The Maine Revives Our Emo Phase With Latest Album, 'Lovely, Little, Lonely'
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Hailing themselves as one of the only bands left to save rock n’ roll in this generation, along with Arctic Monkeys and The Libertines, Kasabian return with a banging sixth album – For Crying Out Loud.

Enveloped in crunchy guitar-driven tracks and heavy beats, the album seems to be propelled by continuous swagger. It’s almost as though every track was formulated to open with alluring intros, engulfing listeners to a whirlwind of head-banging experience.

Ruthless melodies mixed with hypnotic riffs find their way into songs like Comeback Kid, You’re In Love With a Psycho, and Bless This Acid House, which many classic rock fans unsurprisingly swoon over.It’s undeniable that Kasabian’s powerful personality seeps through every note of these tracks.

The Leicester natives definitely know what they’re doing when it comes to keeping their name afloat in the music scene. While critics begged for a lyrical execution on par with guitarist and songwriter Serge Pizzorno’s seemingly egoistic ideas and philosophical claims, I think the album delivered many fans musical expectations.

 

 

Track Gems: You’re In Love With a Psycho, Good Fight, Bless This Acid House, Put Your Life On It

 

Photo Credit: Columbia Records, Dork Magazine

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New alternative rock band, half•alive, is a product of a 50 song challenge that was carried out by band's frontman, Josh Taylor in 2016.

half•alive consists of frontman Josh Taylor, drummer Brett Kramer, and GRAMMY nominated producer James Krausse, who came together in 2016 to help with Josh's challenge. A few days ago, half•alive released their debut EP, 3, and though it is made up of only 3 tracks, it's really packed with heaps of emotions. For lack of a better comparison, their sound could be said to resemble that of twenty one pilots' but milder, so if you love TØP, you'll love half•alive.

3 starts off with The Fall, and already, the emotion in the lyrics is deep and heartfelt. The music itself is simple, with synth, drums, and bass, so it has a clean sound. Its rhythm is on the upbeat side - not something you'd usually get with heavy lyrics like The Fall's: / It’s like sharing a dream with someone / Once you say it out loud it can’t be undone / I can't trust the fall /

Easily my favourite off the EP, the second track, Aawake at Night, is slower and has a catchier hook to it. The chorus is slow, yet bouncy at the same time - its beat could be described as that of a slow R&B song but with an electro-pop melody. Aawake at Night starts off with a jazzy sounding guitar and leads into more of an electro sound to it compared to The Fall, but gosh, the lyrics are just as amazing: / Abandoned by my company, I'll search for what's in front of me / And hope that I find something new /

The final track, Tip Toes, is heavier and more upbeat and has more of a rock sound to it. Keeping its slight electro element, it complements the main melody and even adds a few "mini drops". This song has a promenent bassline so you can really feel the groove in this song. Tip Toes has soft rap/spoken word verses, while the chorus is sung smoothly again with hard hitting lyrics: / I'm on my tip toes tryna see past my ego / Reaching for something more than this feeling of being important /

Overall, half•alive has great energy and an even greater sound. It's quite clear that the key element to their songs is the lyrics because of the emotion and meaning they carry, on top of the fact that Josh had put a lot of effort into really challenging himself musically.

Do give this band a listen because every member has amazing talent that blends together to form a meaningful product. 3 is available for free on all streaming sites like Spotify and YouTube.

Watch the music video for The Fall and check out the full EP down below.

 

 

 

Photo Credits: half•alive (YouTube)

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For avid fans of Arizona’s “Emo Group,” Lovely, Little, Lonely, might come out as an experimental record that begs for deviation. Music critics have labelled it more pop and indie-sounding, a far cry from their debut album. But one thing’s for sure, The Maine has added new elements in this record that hasn’t been done in their previous incarnations, which is rather a hit or miss for new listeners.

The album’s constant online teasers kept us up to date with the quintet’s creative process - from vlogging their typical recording day to immortalizing late night jamming sessions on Instagram. But unfortunately, the hype gave it all away, leading to slight disappointment for fans that anticipated more from the band.

Lovely, Little, Lonely opens with a signature The Maine riff in Don’t Come Down – an anthem of a song that seems to translate the euphoria in being able to let go. It’s followed by the well-received single, Bad Behavior, which I believe captured the band’s alternative rock yet melodic sound.

One distinct addition in the album would be the interludes that divide the songs into chapters, with each title track derived from the album name, “Lovely, Little, Lonely." Hence, making the entirety a form of narrative, with each interlude assisting the storytelling.

But if there's anything frontman John O'Callaghan wants to convey, it's the essence of showing that "boys" can be vulnerable too. After all, what's being labelled an "emo band" if not for the actual expression of genuine emotions? It is mostly evident in the latter part of the record in songs like Black Butterflies and Déjà Vu, I Only Wanna Talk To You, and the last track How Do You Feel? - a song that John was able to channel his inner Morrissey in through the opening verse, “Dearly depressed, and broken-hearted, I’d like to let you know that boys cry too.”

The Maine remains to be one of those bands who would rather stick to authenticity than focus on creating meaningless pop hits. Though this album might not have resonated with older fans, it is safe to say that the band has matured well enough to still be able to execute a part of nostalgia we will always revisit.

Listen to the album here:

 

Track Gems: Don’t Come Down, Taxi, Lost In Nostalgia, Bad Behavior

Photo Credit: 8123

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If you’re a fan of The 1975-esque alternative rock, you’ll definitely get into up and coming Australian band Chase Atlantic. The band, consisting of brothers Clinton and Mitchel Cave as well as Christian Anthony, have been working closely with the Madden brothers, Joel and Benji to dish out some hypnotic alt tunes.

Chase Atlantic’s latest release, Part One - a set of three singles from an upcoming album - bring a refined, classier sound to the band following their previous two EPs, Dalliance and Nostalgia.

The set starts with Right Here, which begins with a slow electronic rhythm and builds up to a steady kick beat as the verse progresses. Their classic saxophone sound makes a comeback in their new music towards the end of Right Here, finishing the song energetically.

Into It has a more upbeat tempo which would make for great club music. Additional filters and layering here and there give off an entrancing, hypnotic vibe, and that is then carried forward to the final song, Church. Church ties the whole set of songs together as it brings up the beat even more and ends mid-beat, with an unfinished sound, leaving you wanting to hear more.

Ultimately, if you’re looking for some sensual music to chill to, Chase Atlantic’s Part One is definitely what you need.

 

 

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The name practically says it all.

DNCE has taken over the music charts by storm with each single they have released and their self-titled debut LP DNCE is a body of work of 14 songs that basically takes a loud hailer and yells in your ear that the band will not be going anywhere else anytime soon.

Back in October of 2015, the American dance-rock band has definitely left their mark in the music industry with their first EP SWAAY which produced two super successful singles Cake by the Ocean and Toothbrush. But now, the four piece group has surely made a name for themselves and makes it is clear that they are a force to be reckoned with.

Their self-titled studio album includes three tracks from their EP plus eleven new songs for the world to hear and know for themselves that the band is not just a one-trick pony. The MTV Video Music Award's Best New Artist for 2016 can perform not just dance-orientated songs but they show another side to them by gifting us with slower jams like Truthfully and Almost.

If you want people to remember your name, having a self-titled album is not enough. You need a song named after you as well. DNCE was very cleverly written. The lyrics of the song not only included the band's name but also gave an insight to the inspiration behind their name while giving it a little story line.

The multi-talented frontman of DNCE, Joe Jonas, not only has an incredible high range that can be heard in Zoom but he also co-wrote every track on the standard edition of the album. This album consists of songs like Toothbrush, Good Day and Pay My Rent that talk about some of life's situations but they were given very unique concepts that were written in an unusual and interesting way.

So if you ever need a playlist for whatever party you're at, don't even bother having a customised playlist. All you need to do is to bump the entire DNCE album to have a blast!

 

Photo credit: Republic Records

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